“I am not sure there was a better place”… Part 3 of Q & A with Dr. Sharony Green on “Fancy Girls,” women and more in American history

“I think as more scholars and laymen are courageous enough to tell and discuss these messy stories, the stain will be there although inside a larger narrative. The stain is the multi-layered pain. The stain is also complacency with old stories that rightly emphasize real oppression, although to the exclusion of evidence that complicates the oppression.” -Sharony Green…from the final installment of her interview for her recently-released book, Remember Me to Miss Louisa: Hidden Black-White Intimacies in Antebellum America (Northern Illinois University Press; 2015; $24.95; ISBN: 978-0-87580-723-2). … More “I am not sure there was a better place”… Part 3 of Q & A with Dr. Sharony Green on “Fancy Girls,” women and more in American history

“Remember Me To Miss Louisa”: Q & A with author and historian Sharony Green

“Critical study of womanhood, in all its complexities, is needed for today’s women who are still living through so many oppressions. Not that much has happened that we get to escape societal agreements about our sanity, our worth, our ability to contribute, our need for rest and to be protected and to protect and so on.” Dr. Sharony Green, on her work and book “Remember Me to Miss Louisa: Hidden Black-White Intimacies in Antebellum America” … More “Remember Me To Miss Louisa”: Q & A with author and historian Sharony Green

Read my new story “No Comment” in Helen Presents: Friday Night Specials.

“No Comment” is excerpted from my novelette of the same name, about a Las Vegas to New York transplant who buys a one-way train ticket to leave the Big Apple, unfulfilled wishes and her abusive relationship behind. Helen is a print and digital literary magazine focused on the culture of Nevada and Las Vegas. If you get a chance to read “No Comment” I’d like to know your thoughts and responses about the character and issues she raises. Thank you for reading… … More Read my new story “No Comment” in Helen Presents: Friday Night Specials.

We Love Barbie…But We Need New Dolls: My piece on Artist Tiffany Gholar over at BlogHer.com.

“As a young woman dealing with my own issues of body image, I began to look differently at Barbie dolls. I began to wonder whether my re-emerging interest in fashion dolls was a good or a bad thing. And the more I confronted my own disordered patterns of eating and exercise, the more I realized the extent to which social pressure to conform to such stringent standards was the real issue I was facing.” -Tiffany Gholar, THE DOLL PROJECT … More We Love Barbie…But We Need New Dolls: My piece on Artist Tiffany Gholar over at BlogHer.com.