A Powerful 2017 For Us All…

Harlem Arts Salon

We can all magnify our voices this year, to make some serious contributions and change some lives. I hope you take your ideas and visions- a new business, more love in your relationships, superior health, more education- to new heights. Continue reading

Tales From a Women-Activated Universe: Author Lisa B. DuBois on her debut story collection, OF LOVE AND SOUND MIND

Lisa DuBois

Mrs. DuBois is a young master of its form, with characters I appreciate and respect within mere paragraphs of her writings of them, and full-circled or open-ended tales I can explore my own life and relationships through. The depth and variety of her public introductory work is profound. And, she is not stopping anytime soon… Continue reading

“I am not sure there was a better place”… Part 3 of Q & A with Dr. Sharony Green on “Fancy Girls,” women and more in American history

“I think as more scholars and laymen are courageous enough to tell and discuss these messy stories, the stain will be there although inside a larger narrative. The stain is the multi-layered pain. The stain is also complacency with old stories that rightly emphasize real oppression, although to the exclusion of evidence that complicates the oppression.” -Sharony Green…from the final installment of her interview for her recently-released book, Remember Me to Miss Louisa: Hidden Black-White Intimacies in Antebellum America (Northern Illinois University Press; 2015; $24.95; ISBN: 978-0-87580-723-2). Continue reading

“I never let white men get off easy…”: Q & A with author and historian Sharony Green on black-white intimacies in antebellum America (PART 2)

Sharony Green

“Yes, it’s hard to write and publish a book like this with Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Sandra Bland and Freddie Gray and so many others no longer with us. Trayvon attended my sister’s church. His mother still does. These souls and racism are right here beside all of my messy evidence, past and present.” -Dr. Sharony Green, historian and author
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“Remember Me To Miss Louisa”: Q & A with author and historian Sharony Green

Remember Me to Miss Louisa

“Critical study of womanhood, in all its complexities, is needed for today’s women who are still living through so many oppressions. Not that much has happened that we get to escape societal agreements about our sanity, our worth, our ability to contribute, our need for rest and to be protected and to protect and so on.” Dr. Sharony Green, on her work and book “Remember Me to Miss Louisa: Hidden Black-White Intimacies in Antebellum America” Continue reading

Billy Strayhorn: An Illustrated Life

Strayhorn

The gospel-influenced and classically-trained pianist and composer is in renaissance of interest and celebration thanks to the establishment of Billy Strayhorn Songs in 1997. The family-owned company’s efforts include marking the centennial of his birth in 2015. The Bill Strayhorn Foundation, Inc’s is committed to deepening appreciation for jazz music in general, starting with Strayhorn. Now longtime fans and new discoverers can enjoy Strayhorn: An Illustrated Life, a fine biographical coffee table book available from Bolden Books/Agate Publishing in Chicago. Continue reading

Behind A Bitter Pill… Q & A with author Tiffany Gholar

One book with four different covers is just one aspect of the special story and brilliance behind ‘A Bitter Pill to Swallow’, just released from Blurb Books as the debut novel from writer and visual artist Tiffany Gholar. ‘A Bitter Pill to Swallow’ is a literal and figurative testimony of perseverance, triumph and concern for humanity in a novel debut more than twenty years in the making. Continue reading

Doing Toni Proud… Four Black Women Authors Speak

Black women authors - negression

Toni Morrison can be proud of other Black American women authors’ unabashed portrayals of Black American people as honorable but flawed, saintly but imperfect, and whole but struggling in ways both certainly and only gently connected to racism. Continue reading