We Love Barbie…But We Need New Dolls: My piece on Artist Tiffany Gholar over at BlogHer.com.

“As a young woman dealing with my own issues of body image, I began to look differently at Barbie dolls. I began to wonder whether my re-emerging interest in fashion dolls was a good or a bad thing. And the more I confronted my own disordered patterns of eating and exercise, the more I realized the extent to which social pressure to conform to such stringent standards was the real issue I was facing.” -Tiffany Gholar, THE DOLL PROJECT

The Hollywood Reporter Addresses Black Stars’ Racial Abuses Through Life of Hattie McDaniel, the First Black Oscar Winner

In addition to recasting Hattie McDaniels for today's audiences as less of an easy-street heroine who won the first Oscar for Blacks and more of a lifelong victim of emotional abuse in Hollywood due to her color, any Millennials who love Hollywood but never knew Hattie can no longer say they were not told.

It’s Hard Out Here For a Sister…

If Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin and Oscar Grant have leaped forth as dark angels to provide us with long-overdue narratives to outline and verify real patterns of mistreatment and injury black men endure, then “Rudy’s” puzzling treatment on the same network she helped bolster so gives us similar analogy for black womahood in America.

We Had Some Phenomenal Fiction in 2014.

It feels wondrous to see a Black American woman at the helm of both literary and mainstream fiction in America (Roxane Gay), and we are all happy for Jacqueline Woodsons' National Book Award win. However, I wondered where were big, majestic books by my Black American sisters at front of the bookstore and many more smaller books Black American women really had to talk about?