Terpischore’s Atrium with Kalisha Buckhanon

Kalisha:

I am happy and blessed to share my interview with Shinjini Bhattacharjee, Editor-in-Chief of the fine new literary journal Hermeneutic Chaos, which published a portion of my new novel with much encouragement and interest. My interview appears in the journal’s companion blog Morphemic Morphology. I hope our words inspire you. Blessings, Kalisha

Originally posted on Morphemic Morphology:

Welcome to Terspischore’s Atrium, where the Hermeneutic Chaos editors find delight in the elfin task of  confronting their contributing authors with some really tough questions.

Today, our Editor-in-Chief Shinjini Bhattacharjee interviews Kalisha Buckhanon, who is undoubtedly one of the most talented writers in the contemporary literary milieu. Her debut venture, Upstate, was published in 2006 to massive critical acclaim, and won an American Library Association ALEX Award and an Audie Award in Literary Fiction for its audiobook, besides being a Hurston-Wright Foundation Debut Fiction finalist. Her sophomore novel, Conception, was greeted with much greater enthusiasm, and won a Friends of American Writers Adult Literature Award. Kalisha has been awarded an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in Prose; a Zora Neale Hurston/Bessie Head Fiction Award at the Gwendolyn Brooks Black Literature and Writing Conference, for her short story “Card Parties” ; the Terry McMillan Young Author Award at the National Book Club Conference; an Honorable Mention in…

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Holiday’s “God Bless the Child” and Morrison’s “God Help the Child”

Lady Day

The mantra of “God bless the child…” is actually Morrison’s most consistent answer to black women. Enjoy Holiday’s original version, as well as these covers. Continue reading

Toni Morrison’s New Novel is Out.

Morrison

From Goodreads: At the center: a woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life; but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love until she told a lie that ruined the life of an innocent woman, a lie whose reverberations refuse to diminish . . . Continue reading

What Billie and Phyllis Sang About

Harlem

Read my story “What Billie and Phyllis Sang About”, about an abandoned black woman left to survive alone in Harlem, in the new issue of Atticus Review. My favorite Billie Holiday and Phyllis Hyman music is on the story’s companion soundtrack Here. #BillieandPhyllis Continue reading

A Story and a Mentor’s Memoir

Crack the Spine

Look into my new story just published in Crack the Spine Literary Magazine: “The Incredibly Short Love Affair of Sixo Reese”… and the memoir WHAT COMES NEXT AND HOW TO LIKE IT by Abigail Thomas, the magnificent writer and teacher who taught the workshop where the story was born. Continue reading

My Favorite Life’s Essentials With Ruby Dee™

Life's Essentials with Ruby Dee Movie Poster

The filmmakers will next take Life’s Essentials with Ruby Dee™ to New York City and the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Saturday, March 28. To keep up with new screenings as well as upcoming news about DVD availability, follow hasthtags #RubyDeeStory and #LoveArtActivism. Continue reading

Read my new story “No Comment” in Helen Presents: Friday Night Specials.

Helen a literary magazine

“No Comment” is excerpted from my novelette of the same name, about a Las Vegas to New York transplant who buys a one-way train ticket to leave the Big Apple, unfulfilled wishes and her abusive relationship behind. Helen is a print and digital literary magazine focused on the culture of Nevada and Las Vegas. If you get a chance to read “No Comment” I’d like to know your thoughts and responses about the character and issues she raises. Thank you for reading… Continue reading

We Love Barbie…But We Need New Dolls: Read my piece on Artist Tiffany Gholar over at BlogHer.com.

doll project 2

“As a young woman dealing with my own issues of body image, I began to look differently at Barbie dolls. I began to wonder whether my re-emerging interest in fashion dolls was a good or a bad thing. And the more I confronted my own disordered patterns of eating and exercise, the more I realized the extent to which social pressure to conform to such stringent standards was the real issue I was facing.” -Tiffany Gholar, THE DOLL PROJECT Continue reading

International Women’s Day: 10 Women to Read

The Coffin Tree

This gallery contains 11 photos.

Here is a list of diverse women writers around the globe, many of foreign descent but living and writing in the United States. Whether writing explicitly about women’s oppression and political unrest in literary fiction or veiling such concerns within the conventions of popular genres, these voices from the mainstream margins are central figures within their own cultures and among women writers everywhere. Continue reading

Remembering Mary Ellen Pleasant

Free Enterprise

Mary Ellen Pleasant, one of America’s first Black female millionaires, made her fortune in the San Francisco area as a partner and consultant to Gold Rush enterprisers. In the 19th Century, racist conductors ejected Pleasant from her trolley car on two occasions for which she sued in landmark civil right cases history has all but forgotten. Continue reading

Have You Heard? Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga

Nervous Conditions

Set in Rhodesia in the 1960’s, Tsitsi Dangarembga’s NERVOUS CONDITIONS (1988) is a classic novel enduring unto today for its memorable protagonist and strong statements about gender inequities of women, stolen educational access and resource gaps in a politically-charged nation. Continue reading

The Hollywood Reporter Addresses Black Stars’ Racial Abuses Through Life of Hattie McDaniel, the First Black Oscar Winner

hattieoscar

In addition to recasting Hattie McDaniels for today’s audiences as less of an easy-street heroine who won the first Oscar for Blacks and more of a lifelong victim of emotional abuse in Hollywood due to her color, any Millennials who love Hollywood but never knew Hattie can no longer say they were not told. Continue reading

My Story IN 21 DAYS as part of Winter Tangerine Review’s “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” Project

Hands Up Don't Shoot

Proud for the beautiful opportunity to be featured in this project published by Winter Tangerine Review. My story “In 21 Days” appears. I wrote the story to provide my energy to the reality of a disproportionate number of Black Americans who are sentenced to hard time or who await the death penalty. Continue reading